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Types of motion

Jogging

Jogging motion is the simplest and most common type of motion. Jogging an electric motor can be accomplished in two ways, momentary or maintained. Momentary jogging dictates continual input from a user. The user must press and hold a pushbutton to jog the motor in one direction or the other. Maintained jogging is accomplished through a one-time command such as pressing and releasing a pushbutton. Momentary jogging stops when the user releases a pushbutton. Maintained jogging stops when the user presses the stop pushbutton or the motor reaches a limit switch.

Positioning

Positioning applications move an electric motor to a specific position. Positioning can be accomplished using an AC, DC, or servo motor along with a feedback device. Servo motors and certain AC and DC motors have encoders mounted on the motor. These devices run in a closed loop to accurately move the electric motor to a desired position. Positioning devices typically use a HMI and input from a user to position the electric motor.

Synchronization

Synchronization motion allows two or more electric motors to be moved in the same direction together. Synchronization motion is most useful in applications that cannot be mechanically coupled. Synchronization provides a means to electrically couple the electric motors. Synchronization uses positional feedback from multiple motors to hold a tolerance between the motors. Synchronization motion uses multiple types of feedback as well as motor control devices.

Variable Speed

Variable speed motion allows an electric motor to be moved at various speeds. Variable speed applications are common in applications where the manufacturing process changes frequently. Variable speed applications are useful in applications where the motor needs to start slowly and ramp up to speed. HMIs, speed pots, and selector switches can be used to vary the speed of an electric motor. HMIs provide the most flexibility by allowing the user to input a desired speed.

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Guide to choosing the right linear actuator
Guide to choosing the right linear actuator
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